Travel

The Adriatic In Five Questions

Article: Melih Uslu Photo: Erkan Tabakoğlu Date: Tuesday, 05 August 2014

HOW WELL DO YOU KNOW THE CİTİES OF THE ADRIATIC AND THEIR SPLENDID BAYS ALONG THE UNDULATING COASTLINE THAT STRETCHES FROM ITALY TO THE BALKAN?

01_ It’s Bosnia-Herzegovina’s only city on the Adriatic. This city with a close to 21-kilometer-long coastal strip boasts steep hills, sandy beaches and touristic hotels. Can you name it?

A)Shkodër
B)Neum
C)Zadar
D)Dubrovnik

02_ This famous historic port city with beaches is Albania’s gateway to the west. Ferryboats ply regularly between it and the Italian city of Bari. Which city is it?

A)Tirana
B)Elbasan
C)Berat
D)Durrës

 

 

 

 

In The Home Of Pisa

Date: Tuesday, 05 August 2014

KNOWN FOR ITALY’S ICONIC LEANING TOWER, THE CITY OF PISA IS HOME TO HUNDREDS OF HISTORIC, ARTISTIC AND ARCHITECTURAL WONDERS.

- Be sure to get a snapshot of the leaning Torre Pendente on Piazza dei Miracoli, which is listed as a UNESCO World Heritage.

- Although most of the historic buildings on Piazza dei Cavalieri (Knights’ Square), center of the political establishment in the Middle Ages and the Renaissance, are closed to visitors, they are still worth seeing from the outside.

Kemal Sayar’s Sarajevo

Date: Tuesday, 05 August 2014

WE ASKED PSYCHIATRIST PROF. DR. KEMAL SAYAR ABOUT SARAJEVO, HERZE-GOVINA’S CAPITAL AND LARGEST CITY, THE “JERUSALEM OF EUROPE”.

How did you come to know Sarajevo?
When I went to the reopening of the Mostar Bridge, which was destroyed in the war, I had an opportunity to tour the whole country.

What are three reasons to go to Sarajevo?
To imbibe the living Ottoman culture there, to feel right at home in the heart of Europe, and to recite the al-Fatiha Sura of the Quran for the souls of the martyrs who lost their lives there and of Alija Izetbegović, the country’s first president.

Bordeaux

Illustration: The Design Surgery Date: Monday, 04 August 2014

PLACES TO SEE
01_ See the Pont d’Aquitaine, a stunning suspension bridge over the Garonne River.
02_View the magnificent Monument aux Girondins on Place des Quinconces, one of Europe’s biggest city squares.

Don’t Leave Home Without Recharging!

Date: Monday, 04 August 2014

A NEW SECURITY MEASURE FOR PASSENGERS TRAVELING TO THE U.S. HAS BEEN INTRODUCED AT ISTANBUL ATATURK AIRPORT.

All airlines and airports with direct flights to the United States are introducing a new procedure in line with security regulations set by the U.S. Transport Security Administration (TSA). Under the regulation, all passengers flying to the U.S. will have their mobile phones and laptop computers checked to see if they are charged up. Uncharged devices will not be allowed on the aircraft under the regulation, which is also being implemented by Turkish Airlines.

Health First

Date: Monday, 04 August 2014

24/7 HEALTH HOTLINE HAS BEEN SET UP FOR PASSENGERS TRAVELING ABROAD.

The Turkish Border and Coast Guard Health Directorate has set up a Travel Health Hotline that Turks traveling abroad can consult in case of health problems. For help with health problems you encounter on your foreign travels and information about the risk of infection in the countries to which you are traveling, just call (+90 212) 444 77 34.

Benin Key To Africa

Article: Prof. Dr. Orhan Kural Photo: Jörg Bier Date: Monday, 04 August 2014

ONE OF AFRICA'S SMALLEST COUNTRIES, BENIN IS A VIRTUAL PORT OF ENTRY TO CENTRAL AFRICA WITH ITS POPULATION OF 300 MILLION. THE COUNTRY HAS BEEN DESCRIBED AS THE KEY TO AFRICA FOR ITS SHAPE ON THE MAP.

After flying from Istanbul to Benin’s capital, Cotonou, we begin touring the city. We are in the streets of commercial Cotonou, surrounded by heavy motorcycle traffic. Dantokpa Market and the Handicrafts Center are recommended as must-see places by all the guidebooks. There are many cafes along the Rue de Jonquet.

A Journey In Time: Macedonia

Article: Mehmet Erdoğan Elgin Photo: Cevahir Buğu Date: Monday, 04 August 2014

HOME TO NUMEROUS CIVILIZATIONS SINCE ANCIENT TIMES, MACEDONIA AWAITS VISITORS WITH ITS HISTORIC MONUMENTS, UNPARALLELED NATURAL BEAUTY AND SCRUMPTIOUS FOOD.

With a temperate climate and fertile plains watered by a large number of rivers, mainly the Vardar, Macedonia has been a major center of civilization throughout history. From Alexander the Great, the Roman Empire and Eastern Rome to the Ottoman Empire, which was synonymous with peace and prosperity in the Balkans for centuries, numerous civilizations have left hundreds of unsurpassed monuments in today’s Macedonia. Despite being a small country in terms of area, this land promises visitors delightful days filled with countless historic sites and unusual cultural treasures.

White City

Date: Monday, 04 August 2014

MEANING “WHITE CITY” IN SERBIAN, BRIGHT AND EXHILARATING CITY BELGRADE IS PERFECT FOR VACATIONING WITH KIDS.

ADA CIGANLIJA
Aka “ADA” for short - from “More Beograda” meaning Sea of Belgrade - Ada Ciganlija is summer’s most popular stop with natives as well as tourists. The beaches along the river and their proximity to the city center make this little island an attractive weekend haven.

The Eastern Mediterranean Legacy

Article: Abdullah Said Zeybek Photo: Engin Güneysu, Yusuf Darıyerli Date: Monday, 04 August 2014

HOME TO NUMEROUS CIVILIZATIONS THROUGHOUT ITS HISTORY, HATAY REGALES ITS VISITORS WITH THE WORLD’S LARGEST MOSAIC MUSEUM AND A RICH CULINARY CULTURE.

The first great cultural confrontation between East and West, the Battle of Issus between Alexander the Great and Darius of Persia was fought in what is now Hatay. And Hatay, which has seen the rise of art, culture and civilization ever since that day, has survived to the present by preserving and merging those differences. Cultural richness and diversity live on in Hatay as a prime example of friendship. Embracing its ethnic richness, Hatay offers visitors new worlds to explore.

 

Half The World Isfahan

Article: Özcan Yurdalan Photo: Ömer Doğan Date: Tuesday, 28 January 2014

ISFAHAN, FAMOUSLY CALLED “NESF-E JAHAN” (HALF THE WORLD), IS IRAN’S CAPITAL OF CULTURE AND A CITY BEAUTIFUL IN EVERY SEASON WITH ITS OPULENT PALACES AND GARDENS, ITS MARKETS AND BAZAARS, AND ITS DECORATIVE ARTS, WHICH CONSTITUTE A SCHOOL ALL THEIR OWN IN THE ISLAMIC WORLD.

It was almost morning when we arrived in Isfahan. We entered the city in the mixed light of glaring street lamps and illuminated shop windows. Finding Chahar Bagh Avenue was a breeze. This avenue, which stretches the length of the city and straddles the Zayandeh River, is exactly 403 years old. It is named for the four rows of trees that line it from end to end. “Chahar” means four in Farsi, and “bagh” garden, orchard or just plain greenery. Shah Abbas, who had the city built in the 1560’s, started by building this beautiful avenue. Of its three lanes, lined for kilometers with parallel rows of stately plane trees, the one in the middle was reserved for caravans and cavalry. The lanes at either side meanwhile were arbor-covered promenades running alongside pools, canals and rose gardens. Apart from this majestic boulevard, however, Isfahan’s meandering streets seem now to beckon, now to repel. Those who have been there will know. Gracefully spanning the Zayandeh River with its double row of thirty-three arches is Si-o-se Pol (“si-o-se” means thirty-three and “pol” bridge). One of five bridges over the Zayandeh, Si-o-se Pol has linked its two banks since 1602. Also known as Allah Verdi Khan, the bridge and its vicinity are one of the city’s main meeting places.

REFLECTING THE WHOLE WORLD
There is no shortage of sights to see in Isfahan, which was the Seljuk capital in the 11th century. Heading the list is Imam Maidan with its UNESCO World Cultural Heritage buildings. This square, a few years younger than the Si-o-se Bridge, was once known as Maidan-i Shah or Shah Square. But the universal name current in all times is Naghsh-e Jahan (Pattern of the World). Natives call this the world’s biggest square. And perhaps Nagsh-e Jahan is more of a very large courtyard than a square. Laid out in the city center in 1612, this square is where the city’s pulse has been felt most strongly ever since - a sprawling courtyard surrounded by hundreds of tiny shops as well as the entrance to a large market and an elegant palace with slender wooden columns. The mosques that adorn the square form an intricate web of architectural wonders. Sheikh Lutfullah Mosque is a masterpiece of Safavid architecture. Diagonally opposite it, Imam Mosque boasts magnificent acoustics. And the structure known as the Office of the Provincial Governor is fairly bursting with stunning domes and wall decorations. But let us come now to the square where everything looks Lilliputian when viewed from the terrace of Âli Qapu. Âli Qapu is the Gate of the Imperial Court, once the seat of the state administration. On the sixth floor of this palace, which appears on the front to be three stories, is a music room straight out of a fairy tale. The square is a spectacle by night as it is by day. As dawn breaks some leave, replaced by newcomers who spread their mats and start brewing tea and setting out breakfast. In a nutshell, “Naghsh-e Jahan is the whole world.” Which is just another way of saying that you can pass the time here without ever getting bored.

REFLECTIONS ON THE WATER
City of palaces, bridges and gardens, Isfahan is also a green city. One of its loveliest structures, the Chehel Sotun Palace (Palace of Forty Pillars) has an intriguing name. There are actually only 20 columns at the entrance to this palace set in a spectacular garden, but their number is doubled by their reflection in the pool in front of the building. Events from the country’s history are depicted on the palace’s interior walls. A portrayal of the 16th century Battle of Chaldiran between the Safavids and the Ottomans is just one of them. Another noteworthy palace in the city is Hasht Behesht (Eight Paradises). This palace inside a spacious garden stands out especially for its decorations in the form of bird and animal figures. Today as in the past, nature and animals are much loved in Isfahan, which perhaps explains why the city boasts both a bird sanctuary and a botanical garden. Isfahan’s cultural treasures stemming from its Persian, Seljuk and Safavid past find a serious counterpart in its handicrafts today. Countless crafts from ceramic tiles and mirror inlays to miniature painting, enamel work and stenciling are continuously practiced in this city reminiscent of a colossal workshop. Massoud Nikaeen, one of those responsible for the city’s tourism vision, says that Isfahan is a leader in the handicrafts field. Isfahan, which Nikaeen likens to an impressive work of art in its own right, is waiting to share its beauty with you, right now.

ISFAHAN GUIDE

CARPET CENTER
The area around Naghsh-e Jahan Square is chock-a-block with markets, arcades, bazaars and shops. The most outstanding products in the city are the handwoven Isfahan carpets and kilims. Antiques, spices, candies, exotic lamps, traditional garments, silver and leather goods are also available in the neighboring shops.

TASTING ASH-E RESHT
Kebab is the local culinary favorite. In addition to kebabs made from red meat, chicken, fish and prawns, saffron-flavored rice is another top choice. Other popular dishes include green lentil soup with noodles known as “ash-e resht”, “khoresht mast” or yoghurt soup, meat stew called “dizi”, and falafel.

THE SHAKING MINARETS
Thanks to a technique employed in their construction, the twin minarets of Isfahan’s 14th century Jonban Mosque can be shaken by humans.

GETTING THERE
Turkish Airlines has Istanbul-Isfahan flights four days a week. Departures are at 11 p.m. on Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Saturdays and Sundays. Returns from Isfahan are on Mondays, Wednesdays, Thursdays and Sundays at 4:45 a.m. For information: www.turkishairlines.com

The Traveler Enters His 30Th Year

Article: Gökçen Ata Date: Sunday, 01 December 2013

THE MAGAZINE YOU HOLD IN YOUR HANDS AT THIS MOMENT IS CELEBRATING ITS 30TH ANNIVERSARY! TRAVELING FOR 30 YEARS, FERRETING OUT NEW ASPECTS OF HISTORY, CULTURE AND GEOGRAPHY WHEREVER IT GOES AND SHARING THEM WITH YOU, SKYLIFE IS YOUR CLOSEST COMPANION IN THE SKY. WE KNOW IT!

Every magazine is published in the hope that it will be read from cover to cover. But Skylife goes beyond that as a magazine that is collected by its readers. And that is a source of great pride for us! I might point out that Skylife is the apple of Turkish Airlines’ eye. Compiled with great care from its first issue right up to the current one, it has been expanded and developed continuously to become the magazine you hold in your hands today.
Turkey’s leading international monthly, Skylife is read by Turks, Europeans and Africans from 201 cities in the world today who board Turkish Airlines planes. In short, it is read by hundreds of thousands of people around the globe.

SKYLIFE: THE WORLD IS NO SMALL VILLAGE!
Technology buffs may say that the world is a small village, but we see a world that needs to be recognized and understood everywhere we go. In our eyes this is not disparity but diversity, a richness that needs to be acknowledged, intercultural differences notwithstanding. So, we focus on that richness in every issue of our magazine as we strive to build bridges between peoples, to bring people closer together and to promote Turkey, a bridge between continents, and its beauty around the world.
Let’s have a look at the last 30 years of Skylife, your companion in the sky, as we remember with appreciation all those who have contributed to this enterprise with their articles, their photographs and their efforts starting from the inaugural issue.

1983: TURKISH AIRLINES MAGAZINE
The story of Skylife begins in 1983 as “Turkish Airlines Magazine”. Although the airline had published a handful of issues under the same title in 1972, it was only 1983 that the magazine began appearing on a regular basis. At that time, on the fiftieth anniversary of its founding, Turkish Airlines carried an annual 2.5 million passengers on 30 aircraft. In addition to its expanding flight network and the need to offer its passengers a pleasant pastime on long-haul routes, growing competition in the tourism and aviation sectors all led to the birth of the monthly, and Turkish Airlines Magazine found its readers in the sky.
Undertaking the role of promoting Turkey and Turkish Airlines, Turkish Airlines Magazine filled its pages with the country’s natural and cultural riches. Bringing out features that promoted the traditional arts, it also toured the airline’s flight destinations abroad, describing its experiences and the must-see sights. Not only that, it also briefed readers on developments like airplane purchases and new route openings, as well as offering news and comments on economic and cultural developments in Turkey.

1989: SKYLIFE
Turkish Airlines Magazine was renamed Skylife in 1989. With seriously upgraded content, it immediately distinguished itself from its counterparts and consolidated its identity in terms of content and visuals, earning international prestige. Available in hotels and doctors’ offices, it became a collector’s item. Its features, which began being broadcast on private radio stations in those years, found a place on history and travel programs, sometimes even appearing verbatim in the daily papers. Skylife magazine had become a resource frequently quoted by writers and documentary producers. In 1992, Skylife acquired a sister publication: Cityscope. Focusing on Turkey’s major cities, it served as an events guide.

AND TODAY…
Starting in 2009, Turkish Airlines added another monthly magazine, Skylife Business, along with supplements like Curiocity, Planet and Puzzles, as well as enhancing passengers’ pleasure with special issues to coincide with the Hajj and Umrah pilgrimages. By reducing the dimensions and weight of the print edition of its magazines, whose total circulation today is 750,000, Turkish Airlines achieved an annual savings of 500 tons in paper and 800 tons in fuel, securing gains not only for the economy but also for nature.
Skylife magazine, which developed a new international visual language in a revamp of its design in London last May on the 80th anniversary of Turkish Airlines, continues to reach readers on the internet and as an iPad app. The magazine, which mounted a photograph contest this year on the theme, “Bridges& People”, will keep on being your companion in the sky in new initiatives and on the new routes opened by Turkish Airlines. We hope to meet you time and time again in many more issues to come... 

Kathmandu

Date: Thursday, 03 October 2013

What to See
01- See for yourself the splendor of the Narayanhiti Palace Museum, the former royal residence.
02- After a busy day of sightseeing, take a break amidst the greenery in the Garden of Dreams.

Cuisine/Eating
In addition to the famous “Momo” dumplings, rice and curry dishes are the staples of Nepal cuisine. Try them.

Before Summer’s End: Marmaris

Article: Melih Uslu Photo: Erkan Tabakoğlu Date: Monday, 30 September 2013

ORIGINATOR OF THE BLUE CRUISE, MARMARIS IS POISED TO AGAIN BECOME THE SHINING STAR OF TURKEY’S COASTS WITH ITS GOLDEN SAND BEACHES, SPANKING NEW HOTELS, HEALTH CENTERS AND MUSEUMS.

Pearl of the Aegean, Marmaris is making a comeback.  Local administrators and spokesmen for the town’s future are engaged in a feverish round of activity these days together with the townspeople. They say it’s high time Marmaris made a difference by recreating itself as the world’s star. To this end they have put together a project for Marmaris they call “Five in One”, which includes some exciting services to showcase the city in a novel way. Reclaiming the ancient İçmeler Hot Springs for health tourism is just one of them. Also among the targets are transitioning to sustainable tourism by conducting historical, cultural and strategic surveys of the city. One of those targets aims to trademark Marmaris pine honey by working with the Osmaniye Marmaris Honey House and to promote world awareness of the region’s cultural treasures. The island of Kameriye, known for its Blue Jesus fresco, is being turned into a key destination for faith tourism. But perhaps the most exciting project of all is the ancient city of Amos - known as the Knidos (the famous ancient city south of Datça) of Marmaris for its location atop a forested hill - which has been reclaimed for tourism with the addition of walking paths and signs.

Friedrichshafen

Illustration: The Design Surgery Date: Friday, 30 August 2013

What to See
01_Visit Dornier Aviation & Aerospace Museum.
02_Step back in time at the Schulmuseum (school museum).
03_Climb the 22-meter-high observation tower at the pier.
Things To Go
01_Go canoeing on Lake Constance (Bodensee).
02_Get a bird’s-eye view of the city from a zeppelin.
03_Explore the many beautiful bicycle paths around the lake.

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